Going. To Rome …

 Image: skdesign at 123rf.com

Image: skdesign at 123rf.com

From the kitchen below, the sound of grating coconut, the firm tight sound attesting to the strong hand of the maid. From across the street, the howl and indignant screech of sisters fighting — they’re all right, in a few minutes their young blood will come off the boil and they’ll start cooing to the Labrador pup in their next compound.

In the distance, a car with a souped-up exhaust roared as it took off, and fell silent, humbled by the short streets and multiple turns in my quiet neighborhood.

And there’s the twitter of real birds that don’t know Sunday from the workday. They don’t follow a character limit in their tweets and, much like the humans with whom they cohabit, they’re vying to go viral.


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It is raining to a changed pattern this year. In the mornings there’s a light drizzle. Towards six in the evening, a powerful downpour comes crashing with the vigor and intensity an invasion, takes hold of the city for a quarter of an hour, and in those minutes every evening one feels this rain is forever, this awesome master, descended from heaven to right terrible wrongs. Just as you’re getting used to such a notion the rain stops altogether, in an instant, and turns into a drip-dripping on the roof, an emptying from the gutters, and goes washing down the street. The evening turns cold, leaving every Bangalorean to invent his own hygge — if he will.

Used to be that it only rained nights in Bangalore.


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Right this morning, though, I’m worrying about the weather in Europe. I’m checking the temperatures in Paris and London and Aarhus and Copenhagen and, seeing that it’s about 32 /18 in Rome these days, I’m trying to recall how, for me, 32°c has felt in Europe. As I remember, it feels like 40° in Bangalore, and Bangalore seldom climbs so high.

If you want to know, it’s 27/20 here these days.


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I’ve walked on Roman walls in England, gone down to Roman remains before the Notre Dame in Paris, seen Roman relics across the Iberian Peninsula. I’ve been twice on a Mesa in Israel which they call the Masada. It is by the Dead Sea, and there’s a ramp to its top that the Romans built to take the outcrop and a stubborn Jewish habitation on it that held out for almost a year against them. In India, on walking tours in Mylapore in Chennai, and in Madurai, I’ve listened to wide-eyed tour-leaders talking about Romans trading with India. “Their coins have been dug out hereabouts. Coins to buy what?” I’ve endured the feeling of being dragged back to school, seen (as then) some smart another take the shabbash. “Yes! Pepper! And? Yes! Fine cloth!”

Driving back to Bucharest after a day trip to the Black Sea, my host and I stopped at Tropaeum Traiani, built to celebrate Emperor Trajan’s victory over the Dacians. “It seems to me the Romans had huge problems with their wives,” my host said. “To come to die so far from home.” The monument commemorates 3000 legionnaires and auxilia who died for Rome in the battle (of Adamclisi).

I’ve been many times over many years in Milano. For work. Also in Ancona by the Adriatic, to sell my India-manufactured Western innovations. I’ve gone up the hill at Assisi once, at dusk, and walked up and down its streets. I was en route to another customer location then. And, before I forget, my wife and I have holidayed a week in Florence.

But I’ve never been in Rome.


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On a whim this morning, I pulled out the Rome guidebook by Rick Steeves that I ordered in a moment of vague anticipation a few weeks ago. I opened the Lufthansa app on my iPhone. The rates are high, being punishment for flying at short notice. I’m not sure that hotels have rooms left in August. But I’m going. Next week.

To Rome.